Tag Archives: server

How to Find Server Public IP Address in Linux Terminal

root@test:/var/log/nginx# wget -qO – icanhazip.com
www.xxx.yyy.zzz
root@test:/var/log/nginx# wget -qO- http://ipecho.net/plain | xargs echo
www.xxx.yyy.zzz
root@test:/var/log/nginx# wget -qO – icanhazip.com
www.xxx.yyy.zzz
root@test:/var/log/nginx# curl icanhazip.com
www.xxx.yyy.zzz
root@test:/var/log/nginx#

How to Upgrade IBM Power server firmware fixes through AIX or Linux without an HMC

Installing server firmware fixes through the operating system is a disruptive process. You will need to restart the system.

Notes:

  1. If your system is managed by an HMC, you must apply server firmware through the HMC. For details, see Managed system updates in Updates.
  2. If you have a System i® model running IBM® i, you must either apply server firmware through an HMC or through an IBM i logical partition. If you have a POWER6® Power Systems™ server that is managed by an HMC, you must use the HMC.
  3. By default, the server firmware is installed on the temporary side only after the existing contents of the temporary side are permanently installed on the permanent side. (This process is performed automatically when you install a server firmware fix.)
  4. If you are unable to start your AIX or Linux operating system or server, refer to Obtaining fixes through AIX or Linux when you are unable to start the system.

Perform Steps 1 through 6 to get server firmware fixes through AIX or Linux when you do not have an HMC.

Step 1. View existing firmware levels for AIX or Linux

The Advanced System Management Interface (ASMI) is the user interface to access the server firmware. You can also use the AIX or Linux operating system to view the firmware levels.
  1. Select from the following options:
    • To use the ASMI (AIX or Linux): On the ASMI Welcome pane, view the existing level of server firmware in the upper-right corner below the copyright statement, for example, EM310_006.
    • To use the AIX command prompt (you must have AIX diagnostics installed on your server), continue with step 2.
    • To use the Linux command prompt, continue with step 4.
  2. At an AIX command prompt, enter the following command:
    lsmcode
    The existing levels of server firmware are displayed. For example, you might see output similar to the following:

    DISPLAY MICROCODE LEVEL                                                   802811
    IBM,8231-E1C
    
    The current permanent system firmware image is AL740_088
    The current temporary system firmware image is AL740_088
    The system is currently booted from the temporary firmware image.
    
    Use Enter to continue.
    Notes:

    • The permanent level is also known as the backup level.
    • The temporary level is also known as the installed level.
    • The system was booted from the temporary side, so at this time, the temporary level is also the activated level.
  3. Continue with Step 2. View or download the firmware fix.
  4. To view existing levels of server firmware for Linux, you must have the following service tools installed on your server:
    • Platform Enablement Library – librtas-xxxxx.rpm
    • Service Aids – ppc64-utils-xxxxx.rpm
    • Hardware Inventory – lsvpd-xxxxx.rpm

    where xxxxx represents a specific version of the RPM file.

    Note: If you do not have the service tools on your server, refer to Obtaining service and productivity tools for Linux.
  5. After the service tools are installed on the server running Linux, enter the following at a Linux command prompt:
    lsmcode

    The existing level of server firmware is displayed. For example, you might see output similar to the following:

    Version of system firmware is: AL740_088 (t)  AL740_088 (p)  AL740_088 (t)

    The following table provides descriptions for each of the server firmware levels displayed in the output.

    Table 1. Server firmware levels
    Server firmware levels displayed
    AL740_088 (t) AL740_088 (p) AL740_088 (t)
    The installed level.Also known as the temporary level. The backup level.Also known as the permanent level. The activated level.The level on which the server is currently running.
  6. Continue with the next step.

Step 2. View or download the firmware fix

Follow this procedure to view or download the firmware fix. You can download the fix directly to your server, or you can download it to a computer with an Internet connection and create a fix CD that you apply on the server. If necessary, contact service and support to order the fix on CD. You can also download the firmware fix to a computer that has a network connection to your server and use FTP to download the firmware fix from the computer to the server.

Note: If you plan to create a CD, you will need a CD burner and software.
  1. From a computer or server with an Internet connection, go to the Fix Central Web site at http://www.ibm.com/support/fixcentral/.
  2. Choose from the following options:
    1. If you have a System p® server, select System p in the Product Group list.
    2. If you have a POWER6 Power Systems server, select Power in the Product Group list.
  3. Select Firmware and HMC in the Product list.
  4. If prompted, select POWER5 and POWER6 class in the Processor type list.
  5. Select your Machine Type-Model and click Continue.
  6. Follow the on-screen prompts to download the fix file.
  7. Select from the following options:

Step 3. View and unpack the RPM file that contains the server firmware

If you created a CD with the RPM file, you will need to view and unpack the RPM file that contains the server firmware.
  1. Select from the following options:
    • If you created a CD with the RPM file, continue with the next step.
    • If you downloaded the RPM file to your server from the Fix Central Web site at http://www.ibm.com/support/fixcentral/ or by using the FTP method, continue with step 6.
  2. Insert the CD that contains the RPM file into the media drive on your server.
  3. To mount the CD, select from the following options (you need root user authority):
    • If you are working on an AIX system, enter the following at an AIX command prompt:
      mount /dev/cd0 /mnt
    • If you are working on a Linux system, enter one of the following commands at a Linux command prompt:
      mount -t iso9660 /dev/cdrom /mnt 

      or

      mount -t iso9660 /dev/dvdrom /mnt
  4. Select from the following options:
    • If the mount was successful, continue with step 6.
    • If the mount was unsuccessful, continue with the next step.
  5. If you received the message,
    mount: 0506-324 Cannot mount /dev/cd0 on /mnt, perform the following steps to mount the CD:

    1. Enter the command:
      /usr/sbin/mount -v 'cdrfs' -f'' -p'' -r'' /dev/cd0 /mnt

      The quotation marks following the f, p, and r are two single quotation marks with no space between them.

      Note: If you prefer, you can use the System Management Interface Tool (SMIT) to mount the CD.
    2. Continue with the next step.
  6. To view the RPM file name, enter the following command at the AIX or Linux command prompt:
    • If the RPM file is on CD, type:
      ls /mnt
    • If the RPM file is on the server, type:
      ls /tmp/fwupdate
    The name of the RPM file is displayed. For example, you might see output similar to the following:

    01EM3xx_yyy_zzz.rpm
  7. To unpack the RPM file, enter one of the following commands at the AIX or Linux command prompt:
    • If you want to unpack from a CD, enter:
      rpm -Uvh --ignoreos /mnt/filename.rpm
    • If you want to unpack from the server’s hard drive, enter:
      rpm -Uvh --ignoreos /tmp/fwupdate/filename.rpm
      where filename is the name of the RPM file that contains the server firmware. For example, 01EM3xx_yyy_zzz.rpm.

      Note: When you unpack the RPM file, the server firmware fix file is saved in the /tmp/fwupdate directory on the server’s hard drive in the following format: 01EM3xx_yyy_zzz.img.
  8. Continue with the next step.

Step 4. Apply server firmware fixes through AIX or Linux to the temporary side of the service processor

Important:

  • Do not interrupt this process after you begin.
  • Do not attempt to log into the ASMI, or use any of the ASMI’s functions, while a firmware installation is in progress.
  1. Ensure you are starting the system from the temporary side of the service processor; the firmware installation will fail if the system has booted from the permanent side. To learn which side you are starting from, and how to change to the other side if necessary, refer to Working with the temporary and permanent side of the service processor.
  2. To use the update_flash command (AIX or Linux) to install the server firmware, continue with step 3.
    Note: If you have AIX installed, you can choose to use the AIX diagnostics to install the fix. However, if you plan to install the fix from CD, you will need to obtain the Microcode Updates Files & Discovery Tool CD to use the AIX diagnostics.
  3. You will need the server firmware fix file name in the next step. To view the name, enter the following at an AIX or Linux command prompt:
    Note: To perform this step, you must have root user authority.
    ls /tmp/fwupdate
    The name of the server firmware fix file is displayed. For example, you might see output similar to the following:

    01EM3xx_yyy_zzz.img
  4. To install the server firmware fix, select from the following options:
    • If you are updating AIX, enter the following at an AIX command prompt:
      cd /tmp/fwupdate
      /usr/lpp/diagnostics/bin/update_flash -f fwlevel
    • # rpm -Uvh --ignoreos 01AL740_100_042.rpm
      01AL740_100_042             ##################################################
      # cd /tmp/fwupdate
      # ls
      01AL740_100_042.img
      # /usr/lpp/diagnostics/bin/update_flash -f 01AL740_100_042
      Error in opening the file 01AL740_100_042
      #  /usr/lpp/diagnostics/bin/update_flash -f 01AL740_100_042.img
      The image is valid and would update the temporary image to AL740_100.
      The new firmware level for the permanent image would be AL740_088.
      
      The current permanent system firmware image is AL740_088.
      The current temporary system firmware image is AL740_088.
      
      ***** WARNING: Continuing will reboot the system! *****
      
      Do you wish to continue?
      Enter 1=Yes or 2=No
      1
      
      SHUTDOWN PROGRAM
      Tue May 14 10:08:53 IST 2013
      0513-044 The sshd Subsystem was requested to stop.
      
      Wait for 'Rebooting...' before stopping.
      Error reporting has stopped.
      Advanced Accounting has stopped...
      Process accounting has stopped.
      nfs_clean: Stopping NFS/NIS Daemons
      0513-004 The Subsystem or Group, nfsd, is currently inoperative.
      0513-044 The biod Subsystem was requested to stop.
      0513-044 The rpc.lockd Subsystem was requested to stop.
      0513-044 The rpc.statd Subsystem was requested to stop.
      0513-004 The Subsystem or Group, gssd, is currently inoperative.
      0513-004 The Subsystem or Group, nfsrgyd, is currently inoperative.
      0513-004 The Subsystem or Group, rpc.mountd, is currently inoperative.
      0513-004 The Subsystem or Group, ypserv, is currently inoperative.
      0513-004 The Subsystem or Group, ypbind, is currently inoperative.
      0513-004 The Subsystem or Group, yppasswdd, is currently inoperative.
      0513-004 The Subsystem or Group, ypupdated, is currently inoperative.
      0513-004 The Subsystem or Group, nis_cachemgr, is currently inoperative.
      0513-004 The Subsystem or Group, rpc.nisd, is currently inoperative.
      0513-004 The Subsystem or Group, rpc.nispasswdd, is currently inoperative.
      0513-044 The qdaemon Subsystem was requested to stop.
      0513-044 The writesrv Subsystem was requested to stop.
      0513-044 The clcomd Subsystem was requested to stop.
      0513-044 The lldpd Subsystem was requested to stop.
      0513-044 The ecpvdpd Subsystem was requested to stop.
      0513-044 The ctrmc Subsystem was requested to stop.
      0513-044 The IBM.ServiceRM Subsystem was requested to stop.
      0513-044 The IBM.MgmtDomainRM Subsystem was requested to stop.
      0513-044 The IBM.DRM Subsystem was requested to stop.
      0513-044 The cas_agent Subsystem was requested to stop.
      All processes currently running will now be killed...
      Unmounting the file systems...
      umount: 0506-349 Cannot unmount /dev/hd10opt: The requested resource is busy.
      umount: 0506-349 Cannot unmount /dev/hd1: The requested resource is busy.

      where fwlevel is the specific file name of the server firmware fix, such as 01EM3xx_yyy_zzz.img

    • If you are updating Linux, enter the following at a Linux command prompt:
      cd /tmp/fwupdate
      /usr/sbin/update_flash -f fwlevel

      where fwlevel is the specific file name of the server firmware fix, such as 01EM3xx_yyy_zzz.img

    During the server firmware installation process, reference codes CA2799FD and CA2799FF are alternately displayed on the control panel. After the installation is complete, the system is automatically powered off and powered on.

    Note: If you receive a message stating:
    This partition does not have the authority to perform the requested function, see Message regarding a server that was previously managed by an HMC.
  5. Continue with the next step.

Step 5. Verify that the fix installed correctly

  1. Select from the following options:
    • To use the AIX or Linux command prompt (the operating system must be running and the diagnostics must be available), continue with the next step.
    • To use the ASMI, view the level of server firmware displayed in the upper-right corner below the copyright statement on the ASMI Welcome pane; for example, EM310_006. If the level of server firmware displayed is not the level that you installed, refer to step 4.
  2. Enter the following at a command prompt:
    lsmcode

    The existing levels of server firmware are displayed. For example, you might see output similar to the following:

    DISPLAY MICROCODE LEVEL                                                   802811
    IBM,8231-E1C
    
    The current permanent system firmware image is AL740_088
    The current temporary system firmware image is AL740_100
    The system is currently booted from the temporary firmware image.
    
    Use Enter to continue.
    
    
    Notes:

    • The permanent level is also known as the backup level.
    • The temporary level is also known as the installed level.
    • The system was booted from the temporary side, so at this time, the temporary level is also the activated level.
  3. Verify that the level of server firmware displayed is the level that you installed.
  4. If the level of server firmware displayed is not the level that you installed, perform the following steps:
    1. Retry the fix procedure. If you created a CD or DVD for this procedure, use a new media.
    2. If the problem persists, contact your next level of support.

An appropriate representation of the requested resource /wp-admin/options-permalink.php could not be found on this server.

Not Acceptable

An appropriate representation of the requested resource /wp/wp-admin/options-permalink.php could not be found on this server.

Additionally, a 404 Not Found error was encountered while trying to use an ErrorDocument to handle the request.

I was getting below error, I believe it is to do with mod_security.

I have tested this by putting below entry in my .htaccess, But unfortunalty does not work for me, so raise a support ticket and disabled with hosting provider.

<IfModule mod_security.c>
  SecFilterEngine Off
</IfModule>

You sure can do it manually. I am trying to find out why the page is blank too, but in the mean time I have manually altered the setting in PHPMyAdmin.

1. Go in to PHPMyAdmin
2. In the sidebar on the left select wp_options
3. Go to Page number: 2
4. click the pencil on the link with permalink_structure
5. In the big box next to option_value and input /%postname%

How to halt the VNX for file / nas server ?

To halt the VNX for file server, type:
# /nasmcd/sbin/nas_halt now
ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT TO CONTINUE? [ yes or no ] :
# yes
Sending the halt signal to the Master Control Daemon…: Done
.
.
Halting system…
flushing ide devices: hda hdd
Power down.
It can take as long as 20 minutes to halt the server, depending on the configuration of the
VNX. Wait until the command completes before continuing. If the Control Station halted
successfully, the HyperTerminal session will be unresponsive.
If the Control Station restarts after the nas_halt command, then go to step 6. If the Control
Station has halted successfully, then go to the next step to restart the Control Station.

Verify the shutdown of the blades:

Wait for 5 minutes, and then log in as root at the login prompt. Then verify the shutdown of
the blades by running the following command:
# /nasmcd/sbin/getreason
Sample output for a four blade configuration:
6 – slot_0 primary control station
– slot_2 powered off
– slot_3 powered off
– slot_4 powered off
– slot_5 powered off

Run the following command to halt the Control Station:

# /sbin/halt
Sample Output:
# /sbin/halt
Broadcast message from root (ttyS1) (Tue 7 13 10:05:55 2012):
The system is going down for system halt NOW!
INIT: Stopping HAL daemon: [OK]
Stopping system message bus: [OK]
……..
……..
Halting system…
md: stopping all md devices.
md: md0 switched to read-only mode.
Shutdown: hda
System halted

Solaris jumpstart from a Linux server

Solaris Jumpstart overview

Only a few articles describe how Jumpstart works under the hood. Here are my findings, all tested on an UltraSPARC based Sun Fire V120, Sun Fire V240 and Sun Fire T2000 servers:

  1. Boot the Sun box into OpenBoot Prompt (aka ok prompt) and invoke a network boot with: boot net -v — install
  2. rarp — The Sun box sends out a rarp request and expects to get its new an IP address in a reply. Jumpstart server runs rarpd for this task.
  3. tftp — With IP assigned the Sun box tries to load a Solaris kernel over tftp from the server that replied to the RARP request.
  4. bootparams — The kernel half-boots and sends out a bootparams request to find the NFS installation source.
  5. nfs mount & mdash; Then it tries to mount the NFS directories and invokes the installation program very similar to what you know from DVD-based installation.
  6. Optionally you can supply a config file for a non-interactive installation. If no config is available Jumpstart will run in an interactive mode.

Required packages

The machine I decided to use for this Jumpstart exercise runs OpenSUSE 11.2 — not really a server distro but good enough for the task. First of all install the required packages. In OpenSUSE use either YaST 2 or command-line tool zypper:

[Linux] ~ # zypper install rarpd nfs-kernel-server

You will also need rpc.bootparamd daemon. I haven’t found an RPM built specifically for OpenSUSE however there is a CentOS 5 package bootparams where you can get this daemon. Install it with --force and it should run just fine. Alternatively compile it from source (or local netkit-bootparamd-0.18-pre1.tar.gz download) with a classic ./configure && make && make install sequence. Whichever way you choose you should end up with rpc.bootpadamd installed in /usr/sbin or elsewhere.

If your server is RedHat, Fedora or CentOS the situation is even easier because bootparams package is directly available:

[Linux] ~ # yum install rarpd nfs-kernel-server bootparams

The following procedure makes use of a lot of different ports. Before moving on disable firewall on the Linux server either with rcSuSEfirewall2 stop on OpenSUSE or with service iptables stop on RedHat, Fedora or CentOS.

Required information from the Sun box

Before going on we’ll need some information from the Sun server, namely its MAC address. It can be found on a sticker somewhere on the case, on the System Configuration Card and is also printed out during boot sequence (ok boot net -v — install):

Sun Fire V120 (UltraSPARC-IIe 648MHz), No Keyboard
OpenBoot 4.0, 1024 MB memory installed, Serial #524012345.
Ethernet address 0:3:ba:1f:ab:cd, Host ID: 831fabcd.

Also decide on the name for the server. In this example we’re going to call it simply sunfire and give it an IP address 192.168.140.205. That’s all we need for now. Let’s configure the Linux server…

RARP configuration

RARP, BOOTP and DHCP protocols all serve the same purpose — they assign an address-less host a new IP address. However unlike the latter ones RARP does that and only that, it provides only the IP address but not a network mask, a gateway address or any other information. That has some interesting consequences as we’ll see in a while. However it’s the protocol used by SunFire OpenBoot environment.

The mapping between Ethernet address and IP address is done in two files on the Linux host: /etc/ethers and /etc/hosts:

[Linux] ~ # echo "0:3:ba:1f:ab:cd sunfire" >> /etc/ethers
[Linux] ~ # echo "192.168.140.205 sunfire" >> /etc/hosts

Now run the daemon in verbose mode and check the message log:

[Linux] ~ # rarpd -v
[Linux] ~ # tail -f /var/log/messages
...
Feb 19 13:08:12 linux rarpd[2383]: rarp who-is 0:3:ba:1f:ab:cd tell 0:3:ba:1f:ab:cd answer 192.168.140.205

Check out the Sun’s booting progress and you’ll see something like:

Timeout waiting for ARP/RARP packet
Timeout waiting for ARP/RARP packet
(here rarpd was started on the Linux server)
Retrying ... Check TFTP server and network setup
Retrying ... Check TFTP server and network setup

TFTP configuration

The Sun server got its IP address and tries to download the kernel using TFTP protocol from the server that responded to the RARP request. The filename requested is C0A88CCD which stands for 192.168.140.205 converted to hex:

[Linux] ~ # printf "%02X%02X%02X%02Xn" 192 168 140 205
C0A88CCD

The netboot kernel is called inetboot on the Solaris 10 DVD. It must be copied to the TFTP directory (/srv/tftp) and symlinked to the above hex-IP name. Then the TFTP daemon can finally be started. Easy, right? Let’s mount the DVD (or the ISO image in this case) to /data/jumpstart/sol10u8 on the Linux box for start:

[Linux] ~ # mkdir -p /data/jumpstart/sol10u8
[Linux] ~ # mount -oro,loop /iso/sol-10-u8-ga-sparc-dvd.iso /data/jumpstart/sol10u8

There kernel is available in three versions: sun4u for the older UltraSPARC I to IV CPUs, sun4v for modern UltraSPART T1 and T2 processors and sun4us for idontknowwhat processors. Our Sun Fire V120 and V240 both need the sun4u variant while the newer Sun Fire T2000 needs sun4v. This example is about V120 so use the sun4u kernel.

[Linux] ~ # cd /srv/tftp
[Linux] /srv/tftp # cp /data/iso/sol10u8/Solaris_10/Tools/Boot/platform/sun4u/inetboot inetboot.sun4u
[Linux] /srv/tftp # ln -s inetboot.sun4u C0A88CCD

We’re ready to start up TFTP daemon (/usr/sbin/in.tftpd):

[Linux] ~ # /usr/sbin/in.tftpd -l -s -v -v /srv/tftp
[Linux] ~ # tail -f /var/log/messages
...
Feb 19 13:22:52 linux  in.tftpd[24576]: RRQ from 192.168.140.205 filename C0A88CCD

Check out the Sun’s console again. There should be something like:

Retrying ... Check TFTP server and network setup
Retrying ... Check TFTP server and network setup
3a000
Server IP address: 192.168.140.101
Client IP address: 192.168.140.205
Using Onboard Transceiver — Link Up.
Using RARP/BOOTPARAMS...
Internet address is: 192.168.140.205
[hangs here...]

You may need to restart netboot on the Sun box if it doesn’t go on with TFTP by itself.

BootParams configuration

At this point the Solaris kernel keeps sending out broadcast packets requesting supplement boot parameters.

Oh, wait, did I say “broadcast packets”? How does it know the broadcast address if RARP wouldn’t supply the netmask?! Well the answer is it doesn’t know it. The broadcast address is derived from the IP address using the obsolete class A/B/C schema, therefore for 192.168.140.205 it’s going to use 192.168.140.255, which is correct in my LAN. However if RARP gave it, say, IP 10.20.30.40 the kernel would use 10.255.255.255 as the broadcast, which is very likely incorrect. I don’t know if the Sun box can be told to use a different broadcast. I couldn’t find a way to do it and had to temporarily change network config of the Linux jumpstart server to 10.x.x.x/8 when I was in that situation. … now back to bootparams config.

The config file is /etc/bootparams and looks like this:

[Linux] ~ # cat /etc/bootparams
sunfire    root=linux:/sol10u8/Solaris_10/Tools/Boot install=linux:/sol10u8/ boottype=:in

The root= and install= parameters are NFS paths to the mounted Solaris 10 DVD ISO image.

Now beware! Another catch! Why does it say /sol10u8 instead of /data/jumpstart/sol10u8? That’s because Solaris tries NFSv4 mount first and as you may or may not be aware NFSv4 mounts all start from a specified directory and do not include the path from server’s root. For instance if we export /data/jumpstart as a NFSv4 root then linux:/ will mount /data/jumpstart/ over NFSv4. To mount the same directory over NFSv2 / NFSv3 we’d have to mount linux:/data/jumpstart but Solaris prefers NFSv4. The other option is to disable NFSv4 support entirely on the Linux server, for example in OpenSUSE set NFS4_SUPPORT="no" in /etc/sysconfig/nfs and restart the nfs server with service nfsserver restart. In that case Solaris kernel will fall back to NFSv3 and /etc/bootparams will have full paths in there. We’ll leave NFSv4 enabled…

Let’s start the NFS server daemons and export the jumpstart directory:

[Linux] ~ # service nfsserver start
Starting kernel based NFS server: idmapd mountd statd nfsd sm-notify    done
[Linux] ~ # exportfs *:/data/jumpstart -o fsid=0,ro,no_root_squash,crossmnt,no_subtree_check,sync

Here fsid=0 makes /data/jumpstart be the NFSv4 root and crossmnt enables the clients to see the ISO image mounted in sol10u8 subdirectory. See the manpage for exports(5) and exportfs(8) for more details.

It may be a good idea to try if we can mount the path that is set in /etc/bootparams:

[Linux] ~ # mount -t nfs4 linux:/sol10u8 /mnt
[Linux] ~ # ls /mnt
 Solaris_10  boot  installer  platform ...

Almost there

Reboot the Sparc server once again — either break into OpenBoot (“ok” prompt) with “break command” (Ctrl-A F in minicom or Stop-A from a Sun keyboard) or straight into LOM with “#.” (“lom>” or “sc>” prompt). In either case issue “reset” and then “boot net -v — install”. Netboot should now run smoothly right into the installation program:

ok boot net -v — install
Boot device: /pci@1f,0/pci@1,1/network@c,1  File and args: -v — install
Using Onboard Transceiver — Link Up.
(rarpd resolving IP address)
Timeout waiting for ARP/RARP packet
(tftpd serving the netboot kernel)
3a000
Server IP address: 192.168.140.101
Client IP address: 192.168.140.205
Using Onboard Transceiver — Link Up.
Using RARP/BOOTPARAMS...
Internet address is: 192.168.140.205
(bootparamd supplying paths to installation sources)
hostname: sunfire
Found 192.168.140.101 @ 0:f:1f:f8:01:23
root server: 192.168.140.101 (192.168.140.101)
root directory: /export/install/Solaris_10/Tools/Boot
(mounting nfs shares)
ramdisk-root [-] ufs-file-system
Loading: /platform/SUNW,UltraAX-i2/kernel/sparcv9/unix
Loading: /platform/sun4u/kernel/sparcv9/unix
module /platform/sun4u/kernel/sparcv9/unix: text at [0x1000000, 0x10a358d] data at 0x1800000
module /platform/sun4u/kernel/sparcv9/genunix: text at [0x10a3590, 0x126b757] data at 0x1866800
module /platform/SUNW,UltraAX-i2/kernel/misc/sparcv9/platmod: text at [0x126b758, 0x126b9c7] data at 0x18bc040
module /platform/sun4u/kernel/cpu/sparcv9/SUNW,UltraSPARC-IIe: text at [0x126ba00, 0x1278f17] data at 0x18bc780
(booting the Solaris kernel)
SunOS Release 5.10 Version Generic_141444-09 64-bit
Copyright 1983-2009 Sun Microsystems, Inc.  All rights reserved.
Use is subject to license terms.
[...]
Serial console, reverting to text install
Beginning system identification...
Searching for configuration file(s)...
Search complete.
Discovering additional network configuration...

Select a Language

   0. English
   1. French
   2. [...]

Please make a choice (0 — 9), or press h or ? for help: 0
[... and so on ...]

That’s all. From now on it’s a standard Solaris 10 installation. Enjoy ;-)

To configure a CLARiiON array to serve as a boot device for a Solaris server, follow these steps:

Note: Check the EMC Support Matrix or E-Lab Navigator for the versions of Solaris and arrays that support using the array as a boot device.

1. Partition your LUN on your CLARiiON array so you have the slices of required sizes.

2. Run the newfs command to make a filesystem on the slices you need.

3. Make a mount point for the slice that you are going to copy to the LUN.

4. Mount the slice at the mount point.

5. Use the cd command to change your current directory to the mounted slice.

6. Run the following command to copy the slice to the array:

# ufsdump 0f – /dev/dsk/cxtxdxsx | ufsrestore rf –

Where x= controller,target,LUN, slice where the OS currently resides.

7. Run the command to copy a boot block to the LUN:

# /usr/sbin/installboot /usr/platform/sun4u/lib/fs/ufs/bootblk /dev/rdsk/cxtxdxsx

Where x= controller, target, LUN, and slice of array LUN.

8. Change /etc/vfstab to the new slices.

9. If ATF is to be part of this configuration, you must install it after setting up the boot partition.