Tag Archives: root

How to Create a Mirrored Root Pool After Installation ?

  1. Display your current root pool status.
    # zpool status rpool
      pool: rpool
     state: ONLINE
     scrub: none requested
    config:
    
            NAME        STATE     READ WRITE CKSUM
            rpool       ONLINE       0     0     0
              c1t0d0s0  ONLINE       0     0     0
    
    errors: No known data errors
  2. Attach a second disk to configure a mirrored root pool.
    # zpool attach rpool c1t0d0s0 c1t1d0s0
    Please be sure to invoke installboot(1M) to make 'c1t1d0s0' bootable.
    Make sure to wait until resilver is done before rebooting.
  3. View the root pool status to confirm that resilvering is complete.
    # zpool status rpool
      pool: rpool
     state: ONLINE
    status: One or more devices is currently being resilvered.  The pool will
            continue to function, possibly in a degraded state.
    action: Wait for the resilver to complete.
     scrub: resilver in progress for 0h1m, 24.26% done, 0h3m to go
    config:
    
            NAME          STATE     READ WRITE CKSUM
            rpool         ONLINE       0     0     0
              mirror-0    ONLINE       0     0     0
                c1t0d0s0  ONLINE       0     0     0
                c1t1d0s0  ONLINE       0     0     0  3.18G resilvered
    
    errors: No known data errors

    In the above output, the resilvering process is not complete. Resilvering is complete when you see messages similar to the following:

    scrub: resilver completed after 0h10m with 0 errors on Thu Mar 11 11:27:22 2010
  4. Apply boot blocks to the second disk after resilvering is complete.
    sparc# installboot -F zfs /usr/platform/`uname -i`/lib/fs/zfs/bootblk /dev/rdsk/c1t1d0s0
    x86# installgrub /boot/grub/stage1 /boot/grub/stage2 /dev/rdsk/c1t1d0s0
  5. Verify that you can boot successfully from the second disk.
  6. Set up the system to boot automatically from the new disk, either by using the eeprom command, the setenv command from the SPARC boot PROM. Or, reconfigure the PC BIOS.

How to Un-mirror a RAID 1 Root Volume on Solaris (SVM) ?

Check your Metastats….

#  metastat -p

d60 -m d61 d62 1

d61 1 1 c0t0d0s6

d62 1 1 c0t1d0s6

d20 -m d21 d22 1

d21 1 1 c0t0d0s1

d22 1 1 c0t1d0s1

d10 -m d11 d12 1

d11 1 1 c0t0d0s0

d12 1 1 c0t1d0s0

1. Detach Sub-mirrors

First, we need to break the mirror, by removing all of the sub-mirrors that are contained on c0t1d0. In our case, we have mirrors d60,d20,d10 and there sub-mirrors followed by next two numbers eg. d61,d62

# metadetach d10 d12

 

# metadetach d20 d22

 

# metadetach d60 d62

 

This will removes submirror from mirrors.

2. de-metaroot

The proper way to create a mirrored root volume is to use the metaroot tool to modify /etc/vfstab and /etc/system for you. The good thing about this is that you can use the same tool to to de-configure it too. Keeping in mind that we want our root slice to be c0t0d0s0, we run:

# metaroot /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0

3. Update vfstab

Now, we need to edit /etc/vfstab and replace all of the mirror device mounts with their c0t0d0 counterparts. If your original vfstab looked like this:

bash-3.2# cat /etc/vfstab

#device         device          mount           FS      fsck    mount   mount

#to mount       to fsck         point           type    pass    at boot options

#

fd      –       /dev/fd             fd      –       no      –

/proc   –       /proc   proc    –       no      –

/dev/md/dsk/d20 –       –       swap    –       no      –

/dev/md/dsk/d10           /dev/md/rdsk/d10        /       ufs     1       no      –

/dev/md/dsk/d60           /dev/md/rdsk/d60        /weblogic       ufs     2       yes     –

/devices        –       /devices        devfs   –       no      –

sharefs –       /etc/dfs/sharetab       sharefs –       no      –

ctfs    –       /system/contract        ctfs    –       no      –

objfs   –       /system/object  objfs   –       no      –

swap    –       /tmp    tmpfs   –       yes     –

Then your new vfstab should look something like this:

#device         device          mount           FS      fsck    mount   mount

#to mount       to fsck         point           type    pass    at boot options

#

fd      –       /dev/fd fd      –       no      –

/proc   –       /proc   proc    –       no      –

/dev/dsk/c0t0d0s1       –       –       swap    –       no      –

/dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0       /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s0      /       ufs     1       no      –

/dev/dsk/c0t0d0s6       /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s6      /weblogic       ufs     2       yes     –

/dev/dsk/c0t1d0s6       /dev/rdsk/c0t1d0s6      /data01 ufs     2       yes     –

/devices        –       /devices        devfs   –       no      –

sharefs –       /etc/dfs/sharetab       sharefs –       no      –

ctfs    –       /system/contract        ctfs    –       no      –

objfs   –       /system/object  objfs   –       no      –

swap    –       /tmp    tmpfs   –       yes     —

4. Configure your Dump Device

Here’s the caveat for mirrored swap – you’re probably using /dev/md/dsk/d5 for your dump device. Let’s fix that now. First run

dumpadm | grep ‘/md/’

If that returns any output, then run this (using your single-disk slice for swap):

dumpadm -s /var/crash/`hostname` -d /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s1

5. Reboot and Verify

Cross your fingers, and do a

init 6

Once you’re back up, look at the output of

df -h && swap -l

and make sure there’s no references to any ‘md’ devices.

6. Remove the Mirrors, Remaining Sub-mirrors, and MetaDB’s

Now that we are running in a single disk environment, we need to remove the mirrors and submirrors. Again, ripe for a one-liner:

# metaclear -r d10

 

# metaclear -r d20

 

# metaclear -r d60

 

At this point, ‘metastat’ should return no mirrors. Now, we can remove the metadb’s from slice 7 on both disks. Only do this if you’re not using SVM for anything else!

You can verify your metadb…

bash-3.2# metadb –i

Now Remove…..

metadb -df /dev/dsk/c0t1d0s7

metadb -df /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s7

 

 

Steps to Root Samsung Galaxy Y GT-S5360

  1. Download Update.zip
  2. Copy the downloaded file to the root of your SD Card via USB Cable or any other method according to your convenience.
  3. Turn of your Samsung Galaxy Y
  4. Reboot into recover mode by pressing Home button + Volume up button and Power button for 20 seconds.
  5. When you are in recovery mode, select “Update from SD Card”.
  6. Now select Update.zip (the zip file you downloaded in step 1) and execute it by pressing the home button.
  7. Now your phone will be rooted after which you can select the reboot option.
  8. After this, your phone is rooted. I recommend you to download BusyBox from the Android Market after you have rooted your phone.