How to Set the date and time of the VNX ?

Set Control Station date and time

You must log in as root to perform this operation.

To set the date and time for a Control Station, use this command syntax:
# date -s “<hh:mm mm/dd/yy>”
where:
<hh:mm mm/dd/yy> = time and date format
Example:
To set the date and time to 5:40 P.M. on August  8, 2012, type:
# date -s “17:40 08/08/12”

Set Data Mover or blade date and time

You can customize the display of the date and time on a Data Mover or blade by
using the server_date command. Configuring Time Services on VNX provides
additional information on time services.

To set the current date and time for a Data Mover or blade, use this command syntax:
$ server_date <movername> <yymmddhhmm> [<ss>]
where:
<movername> = name of the Data Mover or blade
<yymmddhhmm> [<ss>] = where <yy> is the year; the first <mm> is the month; <dd> is the day;
<hh> is the hour (in 24-hour system); and the second <mm> is the minute, and <ss> is the second.
Example:
To set the date and time on server_2 to July 4, 2012, 10:30 A.M., type:
$ server_date server_2 1207041030

How to Configure NTP service using the CLI in VNX NAS ?

1. Log in to the Control Station as root.

2. Check the status of the NTP daemon by typing:
# ps -ef |grep ntpd
Output:
ntp      30818     1  0 Aug07 ?        00:00:00 ntpd -u ntp:ntp -p /var/run/ntpd.pid

3. Display information about the ntpd status by typing:
# /sbin/service ntpd status
Output:
ntpd is stopped

4. Display information about the ntpd configuration by typing:
# /sbin/chkconfig ntpd –list
Output:
ntpd 0:off 1:off 2:off 3:off 4:off 5:off 6:off

5. Open the /etc/ntp.conf file for editing.

6. Add the NTP server IP address to the file by typing:
server 10.xx.xx.xx

7. Save the file and exit.

8. Open the /etc/ntp/step-tickers file for editing.

9. Add the NTP server IP address to the file by typing:
server 10.xx.xx.xx

10. Save the file and exit.

11. Set up the NTP daemon for run-levels 3, 4, and 5 by typing:
# /sbin/chkconfig –level 345 ntpd on

12. Display information about the ntpd configuration by typing:
# /sbin/chkconfig ntpd –list
Output:
ntpd 0:off 1:off 2:off 3:on 4:on 5:on 6:off

13. Start or restart the NTP daemon by typing:
# /sbin/service ntpd start
Output:
ntpd: Synchronizing with time server: [ OK ]
Starting ntpd: [ OK ]
# /sbin/service ntpd restart
Output:
Shutting down ntpd: [ OK ]
ntpd: Synchronizing with time server: [ OK ]
Starting ntpd: [ OK ]

Note: If the response for synchronizing with the time server is positive, the NTP client
was able to communicate with the NTP server.

14. Check the status of the NTP daemon by typing:
# ps -ef |grep ntp
Output:
ntp 25048 1 0 13:09 ? 00:00:00 ntpd -u ntp:ntp -p
/var/run/ntpd.pid

15. Display information about the ntpd status by typing:
# /sbin/service ntpd status
Output:
ntpd (pid 25346) is running…

16. Display the list and status of the peers for the NTP server by typing:
# /usr/sbin/ntpq -p
Output:
r     remote           refid      st t when poll reach   delay   offset  jitter
==============================================================================
*10.0.50.xx      212.26.18.41     2 u  655 1024  377    1.755  -17.314   1.915

How to Change VNX Control Station time zone using the CLI ?

Steps:
1. Log in to the Control Station as root.

2. To verify the current environment, type:
# date
Output:
Wed Aug  8 16:22:54 IST 2012

3. Display information about the current time zone of the Control Station by typing:
# ls -la /etc/localtime
Output:
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 32 Aug  7 22:48 /etc/localtime -> /usr/share/zoneinfo/Asia/Kolkata

4. Set the hardware clock to the current time zone of the Control Station by typing:
# vi /etc/sysconfig/clock
When the file opens, type:
ZONE=”America/New_York”
UTC=false
ARC=false

5. Save the file and exit.

6. Change the current time zone, New York, to Asia/Kolkata, by typing:
# /usr/bin/perl /nas/http/webui/bin/timezone.pl -s Asia/Kolkata
Note: A list of valid Linux time zones is located in the /usr/share/zoneinfo directory.

7. To verify the current environment, type:
# date
Output:
Wed Aug  8 16:22:54 IST 2012

8. Display information about the current time zone of the Control Station by typing:
# ls -la /etc/localtime
Output:
llrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 32 Aug  7 22:48 /etc/localtime -> /usr/share/zoneinfo/Asia/Kolkata

9. Set the hardware clock to the current time zone of the Control Station by typing:
# vi /etc/sysconfig/clock
When the file opens, type:
ZONE=”Asia/Kolkata”
UTC=false
ARC=false

10. Save the file and exit.

11. The time zone of the Control Station is changed to the new location specified in step 6.

How to Set the time zone of the VNX Data Mover ?

You can update the time zone information on the Data Mover by using simple and  decipherable strings that correspond to the time zones available in the Control Station. You can also update the daylight savings time on the Data Mover for the specified time zone.

Set Data Mover or blade time zone manually

To set the time zone on a Data Mover using the Linux time zone method, use this command
syntax:
$ server_date <movername> timezone -name <timezonename>
where:
<movername> = name of the Data Mover
<timezonename> = a Linux style time zone specification
Note: A list of valid Linux time zones is located in the /usr/share/zoneinfo directory.
Example:
To set the time zone to Central Time and adjust the daylight savings time for a Data Mover by using the Linux method, type:
$ server_date server_2 timezone -name  Asia/Kolkata

How to identify your VNX NAS software versions ?

To determine the software versions on the Control Station, Data Mover, or blade,
use the following:

To view the software version running on the Control Station, type:

$ nas_version -l

Output

Name        : emcnas                       Relocations: /nas
Version     : 7.0.51                            Vendor: EMC
Release     : 3                             Build Date: Fri 10 Feb 2012 03:00:06        AM IST
Size        : 669927880                        License: EMC Copyright
Signature   : (none)
Packager    : EMC Corporation
URL         : http://www.emc.com
Summary     : EMC nfs base install
Description :
EMC nfs base install

How to mount remote windows partition / windows share under Linux ?

NAME

mount.cifs – mount using the Common Internet File System (CIFS)

SYNOPSIS

mount.cifs {service} {mount-point} [-ooptions]

DESCRIPTION

This tool is part of the samba(7) suite.

mount.cifs  mounts  a Linux CIFS filesystem. It is usually invoked indirectly by the mount(8) command when using the “-t cifs” option.

This command only works in Linux, and the kernel must support the cifs filesystem. The CIFS protocol is the successor to the SMB  pro-tocol and is supported by most Windows servers and many other commercial servers and Network Attached Storage appliances as well as by the popular Open Source server Samba.

The mount.cifs utility attaches the UNC name (exported network resource) to the local directory mount-point. It is possible to set the mode for mount.cifs to setuid root to allow non-root users to mount shares to directories for which they have write permission.

Options  to  mount.cifs  are  specified  as a comma-separated list of key=value pairs. It is possible to send options other than those listed here, assuming that the cifs filesystem kernel module (cifs.ko) supports them. Unrecognized cifs mount options  passed  to  the cifs vfs kernel code will be logged to the kernel log.

mount.cifs causes the cifs vfs to launch a thread named cifsd. After mounting it keeps running until the mounted resource is unmounted (usually via the umount utility).

Usage :

# mount -t cifs //10.xx.5x.1xx/ABC  /win-mount -o user=sgd.shd,domain=sfgmain

Password:

 

1) Make sure you have following information:
==> Windows username and password to access share name
==> Sharename (such as //server/share) or IP address
==> root level access on Linux

2) Login to Linux as a root user (or use su command)

3) Create the required mount point:
# mkdir -p /win-mount
4) Use the mount command as follows:
# mount -t cifs //Windows-server/download -o username=sdff,password=myPassword /win-mount

Use following command if you are using Old version such as RHEL <=4 or Debian <= 3:
# mount -t smbfs -o username=sdff,password=dscfews //Windows-server/download /win-mount

5) Access Windows 2003/2000/NT share using cd and ls command:
# cd /win-mount; ls -l

Where,

  • -t smbfs : File system type to be mount (outdated, use cifs)
  • -t cifs : File system type to be mount
  • -o : are options passed to mount command, in this example I had passed two options. First argument is password (sdff) and second argument is password to connect remote windows box
  • //Windows-server/download : Windows 2000/NT share name
  • /win-mount Linux mount point (to access share after mounting)

How to Verify the VNX daemons ?

View VNX daemons

 It is essential that the HTTPD daemons run on the Control Station at all times, so the Unisphere software can manage the VNX.

To view the VNX daemons enabled at the Control Station, type:

$ ps -e|grep nas | awk ‘ { print $4 } ‘ | sort | uniq

Output Note

nas_alerterd

nas_boxmonitor

nas_eventcollec

nas_eventlog

nas_mcd

nas_watchdog

The complete list of daemons is displayed in the Output column of the table. The output list for the server might be different. If the daemons are not running, restart them by typing:

/etc/rc.d/init.d/nas stop

/etc/rc.d/init.d/nas star

 View HTTPD daemons

 To view whether the HTTPD daemons are enabled at the Control Station and to re-enable them if necessary, type:

$ ps -e|grep httpd

 Output Note

 1646 ?        00:00:05 httpd

2462 ?        00:00:10 httpd

3990 ?        00:00:00 httpd

11962 ?        00:00:11 httpd

18410 ?        00:00:10 httpd

24905 ?        00:00:06 httpd

24986 ?        00:00:06 httpd

24987 ?        00:00:07 httpd

24990 ?        00:00:05 httpd

28110 ?        00:00:11 httpd

28128 ?        00:00:05 httpd

31507 ?        00:00:05 httpd

If the HTTPD daemons are not running, restart the Unisphere software by switching to root and typing:

/nas/http/nas_ezadm/etc/script restart

How to Halt the VNX Data Movers ?

The following procedure explains how to perform an orderly, timed, or immediate
halt of a network server’s Data Mover or blade. This procedure applies to all VNX
unified and VNX for file systems.

Note: A Data Mover for a VNX for file server is also called a blade. There is no functional
difference between a Data Mover and a blade. They both serve the same purpose in a VNX
for file server.

To immediately halt a Data Mover or blade, use this command syntax:

$ server_cpu <movername> -halt <time>
where:
<movername> = name of the Data Mover or blade
<time> = when the Data Mover or blade is to be halted, specified as one of the following:
{ now | +<min> | <hour>:<min> }

Example:
To halt server_2 immediately, type:
$ server_cpu server_2 -halt now

Output
server_2 : done

How to Un-mirror a RAID 1 Root Volume on Solaris (SVM) ?

Check your Metastats….

#  metastat -p

d60 -m d61 d62 1

d61 1 1 c0t0d0s6

d62 1 1 c0t1d0s6

d20 -m d21 d22 1

d21 1 1 c0t0d0s1

d22 1 1 c0t1d0s1

d10 -m d11 d12 1

d11 1 1 c0t0d0s0

d12 1 1 c0t1d0s0

1. Detach Sub-mirrors

First, we need to break the mirror, by removing all of the sub-mirrors that are contained on c0t1d0. In our case, we have mirrors d60,d20,d10 and there sub-mirrors followed by next two numbers eg. d61,d62

# metadetach d10 d12

 

# metadetach d20 d22

 

# metadetach d60 d62

 

This will removes submirror from mirrors.

2. de-metaroot

The proper way to create a mirrored root volume is to use the metaroot tool to modify /etc/vfstab and /etc/system for you. The good thing about this is that you can use the same tool to to de-configure it too. Keeping in mind that we want our root slice to be c0t0d0s0, we run:

# metaroot /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0

3. Update vfstab

Now, we need to edit /etc/vfstab and replace all of the mirror device mounts with their c0t0d0 counterparts. If your original vfstab looked like this:

bash-3.2# cat /etc/vfstab

#device         device          mount           FS      fsck    mount   mount

#to mount       to fsck         point           type    pass    at boot options

#

fd      –       /dev/fd             fd      –       no      –

/proc   –       /proc   proc    –       no      –

/dev/md/dsk/d20 –       –       swap    –       no      –

/dev/md/dsk/d10           /dev/md/rdsk/d10        /       ufs     1       no      –

/dev/md/dsk/d60           /dev/md/rdsk/d60        /weblogic       ufs     2       yes     –

/devices        –       /devices        devfs   –       no      –

sharefs –       /etc/dfs/sharetab       sharefs –       no      –

ctfs    –       /system/contract        ctfs    –       no      –

objfs   –       /system/object  objfs   –       no      –

swap    –       /tmp    tmpfs   –       yes     –

Then your new vfstab should look something like this:

#device         device          mount           FS      fsck    mount   mount

#to mount       to fsck         point           type    pass    at boot options

#

fd      –       /dev/fd fd      –       no      –

/proc   –       /proc   proc    –       no      –

/dev/dsk/c0t0d0s1       –       –       swap    –       no      –

/dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0       /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s0      /       ufs     1       no      –

/dev/dsk/c0t0d0s6       /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s6      /weblogic       ufs     2       yes     –

/dev/dsk/c0t1d0s6       /dev/rdsk/c0t1d0s6      /data01 ufs     2       yes     –

/devices        –       /devices        devfs   –       no      –

sharefs –       /etc/dfs/sharetab       sharefs –       no      –

ctfs    –       /system/contract        ctfs    –       no      –

objfs   –       /system/object  objfs   –       no      –

swap    –       /tmp    tmpfs   –       yes     —

4. Configure your Dump Device

Here’s the caveat for mirrored swap – you’re probably using /dev/md/dsk/d5 for your dump device. Let’s fix that now. First run

dumpadm | grep ‘/md/’

If that returns any output, then run this (using your single-disk slice for swap):

dumpadm -s /var/crash/`hostname` -d /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s1

5. Reboot and Verify

Cross your fingers, and do a

init 6

Once you’re back up, look at the output of

df -h && swap -l

and make sure there’s no references to any ‘md’ devices.

6. Remove the Mirrors, Remaining Sub-mirrors, and MetaDB’s

Now that we are running in a single disk environment, we need to remove the mirrors and submirrors. Again, ripe for a one-liner:

# metaclear -r d10

 

# metaclear -r d20

 

# metaclear -r d60

 

At this point, ‘metastat’ should return no mirrors. Now, we can remove the metadb’s from slice 7 on both disks. Only do this if you’re not using SVM for anything else!

You can verify your metadb…

bash-3.2# metadb –i

Now Remove…..

metadb -df /dev/dsk/c0t1d0s7

metadb -df /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s7

 

 

How to halt the VNX for file / nas server ?

To halt the VNX for file server, type:
# /nasmcd/sbin/nas_halt now
ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT TO CONTINUE? [ yes or no ] :
# yes
Sending the halt signal to the Master Control Daemon…: Done
.
.
Halting system…
flushing ide devices: hda hdd
Power down.
It can take as long as 20 minutes to halt the server, depending on the configuration of the
VNX. Wait until the command completes before continuing. If the Control Station halted
successfully, the HyperTerminal session will be unresponsive.
If the Control Station restarts after the nas_halt command, then go to step 6. If the Control
Station has halted successfully, then go to the next step to restart the Control Station.

Verify the shutdown of the blades:

Wait for 5 minutes, and then log in as root at the login prompt. Then verify the shutdown of
the blades by running the following command:
# /nasmcd/sbin/getreason
Sample output for a four blade configuration:
6 – slot_0 primary control station
– slot_2 powered off
– slot_3 powered off
– slot_4 powered off
– slot_5 powered off

Run the following command to halt the Control Station:

# /sbin/halt
Sample Output:
# /sbin/halt
Broadcast message from root (ttyS1) (Tue 7 13 10:05:55 2012):
The system is going down for system halt NOW!
INIT: Stopping HAL daemon: [OK]
Stopping system message bus: [OK]
……..
……..
Halting system…
md: stopping all md devices.
md: md0 switched to read-only mode.
Shutdown: hda
System halted